Slavery Advertisements Published August 9, 1769

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Aug 9 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 1
Georgia Gazette (August 9, 1769).

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Aug 9 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 2
Georgia Gazette (August 9, 1769).

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Aug 9 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 3
Georgia Gazette (August 9, 1769).

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Aug 9 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 4
Georgia Gazette (August 9, 1769).

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Aug 9 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 5
Georgia Gazette (August 9, 1769).

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Aug 9 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 6
Georgia Gazette (August 9, 1769).

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Aug 9 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 7
Georgia Gazette (August 9, 1769).

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Aug 9 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 8
Georgia Gazette (August 9, 1769).

Slavery Advertisements Published April 10, 1769

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

Bryant Halpin is serving as guest curator for the week of April 7-13, 2019.  He compiled these advertisements that appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Supplement to the Boston Evening-Post (April 10, 1769).

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Boston-Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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Connecticut Courant (April 10, 1769).

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New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (April 10, 1769).

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New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (April 10, 1769).

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New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (April 10, 1769).

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New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (April 10, 1769).

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Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (April 10, 1769).

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Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (April 10, 1769).

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Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (April 10, 1769).

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Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (April 10, 1769).

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Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (April 10, 1769).

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New-York Gazette: Or, the Weekly Post-Boy (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 10, 1769).

Slavery Advertisements Published February 27, 1769

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

Chloe Amour is serving as guest curator for the week of February 24 to March 2, 2019.  She compiled these advertisements that appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Boston Evening-Post (February 27, 1769).

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Boston Evening-Post (February 27, 1769).

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Connecticut Courant (February 27, 1769).

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Connecticut Courant (February 27, 1769).

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Newport Mercury (February 27, 1769).

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New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (February 27, 1769).

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New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (February 27, 1769).

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New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (February 27, 1769).

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New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (February 27, 1769).

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New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (February 27, 1769).

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New-York Gazette: Or, the Weekly Post-Boy (February 27, 1769).

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Pennsylvania Chronicle (February 27, 1769).

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Pennsylvania Chronicle (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

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South-Carolina and American General Gazette (February 27, 1769).

January 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (January 16, 1769).

“As she is a Stranger, will make it her constant Study to give intire Satisfaction.”

When milliner Margaret Wills migrated from Dublin to New York she placed an advertisement in the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury to announce that she now received customers “in the Broadway, Next Door to Richard Nicol’s, Esq.” She briefly described the services she offered, noting that she made “all Sorts of Caps, Hats, Bonnets, Cloaks, and all other Articles in the Millinary Way.” She incorporated some of the most common appeals made by milliners and others who advertised consumer goods and services in eighteenth-century America: price and fashion. She stated that she charged “the lowest Prices” and that her hats and garments represented “the newest and most elegant Fashion.” In addition, she provided instruction to “young Ladies” interested in learning a “great Variety of Works” related to her trade.

Wills devoted half of her advertisement, however, to addressing her status as a newcomer in the busy port. Unlike many of her competitors who had served local residents for years and cultivated relationships, she was unfamiliar to colonists who perused her advertisement. She acknowledged that she was “a Stranger” in the city, but strove to turn that to her advantage. To build her clientele, she pledged “to make it her constant Study to give intire Satisfaction to those who please to honor her with their Commands.” In so doing, she advanced customer service as a cornerstone of her business. Its allure had the potential to attract prospective clients for an initial visit; following through on this vow could cement relationships between new customers and the milliner “Just arrived from DUBLIN.” It might even lead to word-of-mouth recommendations, but Wills determined that she needed to start with a notice in the public prints to enhance her visibility before she could rely on any satisfied customers circulating any sort of buzz. Her advertisement operated as a letter of introduction to the entire community.

Slavery Advertisements Published December 9, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of December 9-15, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Nicholas Sears (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

New-London Gazette (December 9, 1768).

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New-London Gazette (December 9, 1768).

Slavery Advertisements Published November 7, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of November 4-10, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Patrick Keane (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Nov 7 - Boston Evening-Post Slavery 1
Boston Evening-Post (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 1
Boston-Gazette (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 2
Boston-Gazette (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 3
Boston-Gazette (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Slavery 1
New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Supplement Slavery 3
Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - New-York Gazette Weekly Post-Boy Slavery 1
New-York Gazette: Or, the Weekly Mercury (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - Newport Mercury Slavery 1
Newport Mercury (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - Pennsylvania Chronicle Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Chronicle (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - Pennsylvania Chronicle Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Chronicle (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 1
South-Carolina Gazette (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 2
South-Carolina Gazette (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 3
South-Carolina Gazette (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 4
South-Carolina Gazette (November 7, 1768).

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Nov 7 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 5
South-Carolina Gazette (November 7, 1768).

September 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Sep 9 - 9:9:1768 Connecticut Journal
Connecticut Journal (September 9, 1768).

“Brief Account of the LIFE, and abominable THEFTS, of the notorious Isaac Frasier.”

True Crime! In early September of 1768, Thomas Green and Samuel Green, printers of the Connecticut Journal and New-Haven Post-Boy, sold a pamphlet about an execution of a burglar that had just taken place. “Just published, and to be sold by the Printers hereof,” the Greens announced, “Brief Account of the LIFE, and abominable THEFTS, of the notorious Isaac Frasier, (Who was executed at Fairfield, on the 7th of September, 1768) penned from his own Mouth, and signed by him, a few Days before his Execution.” This advertisement first ran in the September 9 issue, just two days after the execution and presumably less than a week after the infamous thief had dictated his life’s story.

The Greens marketed memorabilia about an event currently in the news. To help sustain the attention Frasier and his trial and execution had generated, they ran a short article about the burglar, offering prospective customers a preview of the pamphlet. “Last Wednesday,” the Connecticut Journal reported, “Isaac Frasier, was executed at Fairfield, pursuant to the Sentence of the Superior Court, for the Third Offence of Burglary; the lenitive Laws of this Colony, only Punishing the first and second Offences with whipping, cropping, and branding. He was born at North-Kingston, in the Colony of Rhode-Island. It is said, he seem’d a good deal unconcerned, till a few Hours before he was turn’d off—and it is conjectured, by his Conduct, that he had some secret Hope of being cleared, some Way or other.” The Greens likely intended that this teaser provoke even more interest in Frasier, stimulating sales of the pamphlet.

To that end, all of the news from within the colony focused on thieves and burglars who had been captured and punished. Two days before Frasier’s execution, David Powers had been “cropt, branded and whipt” in New Haven after being discovered “breaking open a House.” He had previously experienced the same punishment in Hartford, where James Hardig was “whipt ten stripes at the public whipping post … for stealing.” The Greens described Hardig as “an old offender, as it appears he has already been cropt, branded and whipt.” If they did not change their ways, Powers and Hardig would find themselves “Candidate[s] for a greater Promotion” at their own executions. Frasier’s case offered a cautionary tale for anyone who chose to purchase and read his pamphlet.

Although Frasier was executed upon his third conviction for burglary, he recorded more than fifty burglaries and thefts in the Brief Account. According to Anthony Vaver, Frasier had “toured all over New England and into New York, covering hundreds of miles at a time and committing burglaries all along the way.” Vaver provides and overview of Frasier’s case at Early American Crime, including the circumstances of all three burglaries that led to his execution and a map of the route he followed on his crime spree.

Slavery Advertisements Published July 7, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 7 - New-York Journal Slavery 1
New-York Journal (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Gazette (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Gazette (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 3
Pennsylvania Gazette (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Journal Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Journal (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 7
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

Slavery Advertisements Published July 6, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 1
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 2
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 3
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 4
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 5
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 6
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 7
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

Slavery Advertisements Published June 30, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jun 30 - Boston Weekly News-Letter Postscript Slavery 1
Postscript to the Boston Weekly News-Letter (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Massachusetts Gazette Draper Slavery 1
Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - New-York Journal Slavery 1
New-York Journal (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - New-York Journal Slavery 2
New-York Journal (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - New-York Journal Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the New-York Journal (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 3
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 4
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 3
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 4
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Journal (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 7
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 8
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 9
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 10
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 11
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).