September 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Sep 9 - 9:9:1768 Connecticut Journal
Connecticut Journal (September 9, 1768).

“Brief Account of the LIFE, and abominable THEFTS, of the notorious Isaac Frasier.”

True Crime! In early September of 1768, Thomas Green and Samuel Green, printers of the Connecticut Journal and New-Haven Post-Boy, sold a pamphlet about an execution of a burglar that had just taken place. “Just published, and to be sold by the Printers hereof,” the Greens announced, “Brief Account of the LIFE, and abominable THEFTS, of the notorious Isaac Frasier, (Who was executed at Fairfield, on the 7th of September, 1768) penned from his own Mouth, and signed by him, a few Days before his Execution.” This advertisement first ran in the September 9 issue, just two days after the execution and presumably less than a week after the infamous thief had dictated his life’s story.

The Greens marketed memorabilia about an event currently in the news. To help sustain the attention Frasier and his trial and execution had generated, they ran a short article about the burglar, offering prospective customers a preview of the pamphlet. “Last Wednesday,” the Connecticut Journal reported, “Isaac Frasier, was executed at Fairfield, pursuant to the Sentence of the Superior Court, for the Third Offence of Burglary; the lenitive Laws of this Colony, only Punishing the first and second Offences with whipping, cropping, and branding. He was born at North-Kingston, in the Colony of Rhode-Island. It is said, he seem’d a good deal unconcerned, till a few Hours before he was turn’d off—and it is conjectured, by his Conduct, that he had some secret Hope of being cleared, some Way or other.” The Greens likely intended that this teaser provoke even more interest in Frasier, stimulating sales of the pamphlet.

To that end, all of the news from within the colony focused on thieves and burglars who had been captured and punished. Two days before Frasier’s execution, David Powers had been “cropt, branded and whipt” in New Haven after being discovered “breaking open a House.” He had previously experienced the same punishment in Hartford, where James Hardig was “whipt ten stripes at the public whipping post … for stealing.” The Greens described Hardig as “an old offender, as it appears he has already been cropt, branded and whipt.” If they did not change their ways, Powers and Hardig would find themselves “Candidate[s] for a greater Promotion” at their own executions. Frasier’s case offered a cautionary tale for anyone who chose to purchase and read his pamphlet.

Although Frasier was executed upon his third conviction for burglary, he recorded more than fifty burglaries and thefts in the Brief Account. According to Anthony Vaver, Frasier had “toured all over New England and into New York, covering hundreds of miles at a time and committing burglaries all along the way.” Vaver provides and overview of Frasier’s case at Early American Crime, including the circumstances of all three burglaries that led to his execution and a map of the route he followed on his crime spree.

Slavery Advertisements Published July 7, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 7 - New-York Journal Slavery 1
New-York Journal (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Gazette (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Gazette (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 3
Pennsylvania Gazette (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Pennsylvania Journal Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Journal (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

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Jul 7 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 7
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 7, 1768).

Slavery Advertisements Published July 6, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 1
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 2
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 3
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 4
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 5
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 6
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

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Jul 6 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 7
Georgia Gazette (July 6, 1768).

Slavery Advertisements Published June 30, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jun 30 - Boston Weekly News-Letter Postscript Slavery 1
Postscript to the Boston Weekly News-Letter (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Massachusetts Gazette Draper Slavery 1
Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - New-York Journal Slavery 1
New-York Journal (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - New-York Journal Slavery 2
New-York Journal (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - New-York Journal Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the New-York Journal (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 3
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 4
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 3
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 4
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Journal (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 7
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 8
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 9
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 10
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 11
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

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Jun 30 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 30, 1768).

Slavery Advertisements Published June 23, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jun 23 - Boston Weekly News-Letter Slavery 1
Boston Weekly News-Letter (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - New-York Journal Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the New-York Journal (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 3
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 4
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 3
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 4
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 5
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Journal (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 7
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 8
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 23, 1768).

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Jun 23 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 23, 1768).

Slavery Advertisements Published June 9, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jun 9 - New-York Journal Slavery 1
New-York Journal (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - New-York Journal Slavery 2
New-York Journal (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Gazette (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 3
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 4
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Journal (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Journal (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 3
Pennsylvania Journal (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 4
Pennsylvania Journal (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 9, 1768).

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Jun 9 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (June 9, 1768).

Slavery Advertisements Published April 14, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Apr 14 - New-York Journal Slavery 1
New-York Journal (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - New-York Journal Slavery 2
New-York Journal (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - New-York Journal Slavery 3
New-York Journal (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Gazette (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Gazette (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 3
Pennsylvania Gazette (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 4
Pennsylvania Gazette (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 5
Pennsylvania Gazette (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 6
Pennsylvania Gazette (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 7
Pennsylvania Gazette (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Journal (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Virginia Gazette Rind Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Virginia Gazette [Rind] (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Virginia Gazette Rind Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Virginia Gazette [Rind] (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Virginia Gazette Rind Supplement Slavery 3
Supplement to the Virginia Gazette [Rind] (April 14, 1768).

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Apr 14 - Virginia Gazette Rind Supplement Slavery 4
Supplement to the Virginia Gazette [Rind] (April 14, 1768).