November 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Nov 18 - 11:18:1768 New-Hampshire Gazette
New-Hampshire Gazette (November 18, 1768).

“Preparing a number more Accounts to be left with different Attorneys.”

Daniel Fowle and Robert Fowle, the printers of the New-Hampshire Gazette, meant business. They placed a notice in their own publication to inform subscribers, advertisers, and other customers that they needed to settle their accounts or else face the consequences. The Fowles periodically placed such notices, but they ratcheted up the rhetoric in November 1768. The printers were exasperated and they made that clear to readers.

The Fowles declared that they were “determined in a few Weeks, to publish a List of Customers … whose Accounts are of long standing.” With this warning, they offered a grace period. Those subscribers delinquent in settling their accounts could avoid public embarrassment by resolving the matter soon after this notice appeared in the newspaper. If they chose, however, not to take advantage of the grace period then they could expect to have their public shaming compounded by having “the Sum due” printed alongside their name. The printers aimed “to show how injuriously they are treated” by customers who refused to pay their bills.

Furthermore, the Fowles made it clear they were aware of some of the stratagems used by those who owed them money. “Many Customers who live in the Country,” they observed, “are often seen in Town, but if possible avoid coming to the Printing Office.” To add insult to injury, those who did visit often informed the Fowles “how they are involved in such and such a Law Suit, and that they have just paid all their Money to such a Lawyer.” The printers reasoned that two could play that game: “Therefore as they fancy paying Money to Attorneys best, we have left, and are preparing a number more Accounts to be left with different Attorneys.” The Fowles would not hesitate to take legal action if it became necessary.

They made that threat, however, only after publishing gentle reminders for customers to submit payments. Less than two months earlier, they inserted a notice that celebrated the twelfth anniversary of the New-Hampshire Gazette but also called on “a considerable Number of our Customers” to settle accounts. They considered doing so a “great Service.” Several weeks later they abandoned the language of service in favor of legal obligation. Rather than flaunting the money they spend on lawsuits against others, it was time for customers of the New-Hampshire Gazette to invest those funds in paying the printers.

Slavery Advertisements Published November 18, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of November 18-24, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Haley McCormick (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Nov 18 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 1
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (November 18, 1768).

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Nov 18 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 2
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (November 18, 1768).

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Nov 18 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 3
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (November 18, 1768).

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Nov 18 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 4
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (November 18, 1768).

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Nov 18 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 5
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (November 18, 1768).

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Nov 18 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 6
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (November 18, 1768).

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Nov 18 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 7
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (November 18, 1768).

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Nov 18 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 8
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (November 18, 1768).

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Nov 18 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 9
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (November 18, 1768).

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Nov 18 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 10
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (November 18, 1768).

 

November 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Nov 17 - 11:17:1768 Pennsylvania Journal
Pennsylvania Journal (November 17, 1768).

“JULIET BONTAMPS, French Millener … MICHELLE BONTAMPS, Fencing master.”

Juliet Bontamps, “French Millener,” placed an advertisement for her services in the November 17, 1768, edition of the Pennsylvania Journal. In it, she declared that she did “all kinds of millenery work, after the best and newest fashion,” making an appeal to prospective customers who would have been anxious not to appear that they had fallen behind when it came to current styles. At a glance, the milliner was the center of attention in this advertisement. On closer examination, however, Michelle Bontamps may have upstaged her in a theatrical nota bene at the conclusion of the notice. Take notice, it proclaimed, “MICHELLE BONTAMPS, Fencing master, teaches the use of the small sword, at home or abroad, in the most expeditious, approved and easy method, and in order that his abilities may be known, offers himself to fence with any gentleman, or fencing master, either in a public or private place.”

Most likely Juliet’s husband, but perhaps a male relation of another sort, Michelle quite likely created the more lasting impression in an advertisement that promoted the services offered by both. Often when men and women placed joint advertisements for goods or services, the man received top billing and any discussion of the woman’s activities in the marketplace received secondary consideration. The Bontampses upended that convention, making her name and occupation the headline for the advertisement. It may have been a calculated strategy to place Juliet’s “millenery work” first in the notice, a decision intended to make it less likely that Michelle’s sweeping challenge to duel “any gentleman, or fencing master” would eclipse her services. The Bontampses did not present Juliet’s contributions to supporting their household as subordinate; instead, they positioned her as a full partner whose work, distinct from Michelle’s, was not merely ancillary to the family business. The daring of the fencing master may have been flashy compared to the standard appeals made by milliners, but the format and order in which they listed their services made it less likely that Michelle would completely overshadow Juliet.

Slavery Advertisements Published November 17, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of November 11-17, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Kaylen McClarey (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Nov 17 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Gazette (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Gazette (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 3
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Journal (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 7
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 8
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 9
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 10
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 11
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 12
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 13
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 7
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 8
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 9
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 10
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 11
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 12
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 13
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 14
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 15
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 16
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

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Nov 17 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 17
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (November 17, 1768).

November 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Nov 16 - 11:16:1768 Georgia Gazette
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

“About THIRTY VERY LIKELY SLAVES.”

Inglis and Hall’s advertisement for “About THIRTY VERY LIKELY SLAVES” ran in the Georgia Gazette for a second time on November 16, 1768. It briefly noted that more than two dozen slaves had “Just arrived from the West-Indies” and were “To be sold on reasonable Terms.” The notice included a crude woodcut that depicted two adults and a child, though this did not necessarily reflect the composition of the human cargo hawked by the prominent merchants. It appeared in three consecutive issues before being discontinued.

Unlike most advertisements that ran for multiple weeks, it included a slight revision to the copy, the addition of a date: “Nov. 9, 1768.” That date indicated when the notice first appeared in the Georgia Gazette, not the date Inglis and Hall wrote the copy. Given the production time required for setting type and operating the printing press by hand, the merchants would have submitted their advertisement at least a day before the publication date of the issue in which it first appeared. According to the shipping news in the November 9 edition, the slaves likely arrived in Savannah aboard the “Schooner Friendship” from Grenada on November 4 or aboard the “Ship Industry” from Antigua on November 8, the same day that the “Schooner Liberty” arrived from Charleston.

Why add a date to the advertisement? That may have been done at the behest of Inglis and Hall, especially if they wished to make clear to prospective buyers that the slaves they offered for sale had not languished in Savannah for an extended period. John Graham and Company placed an advertisement for “A Parcel of Choice Healthy GUINEY and GOLD COAST NEW NEGROES” in the November 16 issue. Perhaps aware of the competition, Inglis and Hall did not want their advertisement mistaken as one that had appeared for weeks or even months. After all, the notices concerning runaway slaves included some dated July 6 and August 11. Alternately, the compositor may have simply neglected to include the date in the first insertion and rectified the error for the next issue. The updated advertisement, however, at least raises the possibility that Inglis and Hall made an intervention based on new information that came into their possession after it first appeared in the Georgia Gazette.

Slavery Advertisements Published November 16, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of November 11-17, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Kaylen McClarey (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 1
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

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Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 2
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

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Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 3
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

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Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 4
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

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Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 5
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

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Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 6
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

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Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 7
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

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Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 8
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

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Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 9
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

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Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 10
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

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Nov 16 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 11
Georgia Gazette (November 16, 1768).

November 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Nov 15 - 11:15:1768 South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (November 15, 1768).

“WANTS a Place in a Store, either in Town or Country, a YOUNG MAN who can be well recommended.”

Advertisements for consumer goods and services, along with paid notices inserted for other purposes, filled the pages of eighteenth-century newspapers. Some colonists who placed advertisements did so in hopes of finding employment with the purveyors of consumer goods and services, seeking places to earn their own livelihoods in an expanding marketplace. At the same time that the consumer revolution presented many opportunities for entrepreneurship for shopkeepers, merchants, artisans, and other producers of goods, it also created employment opportunities for men and women who assisted retailers in making their wares available to customers.

Consider, for example, an advertisement that ran in the November 15, 1768, edition of the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal. Quite briefly, it announced, “WANTS a Place in a Store, either in Town or Country, a YOUNG MAN who can be well recommended. Enquire of the Printer.” The previous day a similar advertisement appeared in the Boston-Gazette: “A Young Woman that understands keeping a Shop of English Goods, wants such an Employ. Any Person having Occasion for such a one, may know further by enquiring of Edes and Gill.” Both advertisements were published in newspapers that ran numerous advertisements for vast arrays of consumer goods for sale at local shops and stores.

In each instance the prospective employee requested that interested parties “Enquire of the Printer.” They provided little information about themselves beyond initial assurances that they were suited for the positions they sought. The young man asserted that he “can be well recommended” for the job. While this may have referred to endorsements from others, it may also have meant that he could make a case for himself based on his character and experience. The young woman stated that she “understands keeping a Shop of English Goods,” suggesting that she had previous experience.

Not surprisingly, both placed short advertisements, minimizing their expenses as they sought work. Both depended on a local printing office as a place of exchanging information. Printers did more than disseminate newspapers, pamphlets, and broadsides; they also served as information brokers beyond the printed page. In that capacity, they facilitated not only the sale of consumer goods but also the hiring of men and women who waited on customers and otherwise assisted in the operation of shops and stores.

Slavery Advertisements Published November 15, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of November 11-17, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Kaylen McClarey (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Nov 15 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 1
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (November 15, 1768).

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Nov 15 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 2
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (November 15, 1768).

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Nov 15 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 3
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (November 15, 1768).

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Nov 15 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 4
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (November 15, 1768).

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Nov 15 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 5
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (November 15, 1768).

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Nov 15 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 6
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (November 15, 1768).

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Nov 15 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 7
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (November 15, 1768).

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Nov 15 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 8
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (November 15, 1768).

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Nov 15 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 9
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (November 15, 1768).

November 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

nov-14-11141768-boston-gazette
Boston-Gazette (November 14, 1768).

“The CHARTER of the Province of Massachusetts-Bay.”

The first page of the November 14, 1768, edition of the Boston-Gazettefeatured both news and advertising.  Advertisements comprised the first of the three columns.  Extracts from the London Chronicleand the London Evening Postfilled the second and overflowed into the third.  News from Charleston, South Carolina, and New London, Connecticut, nearly completed the third column.  The compositor inserted a short advertisement – just three lines – in the remaining space.

Although the placement of that advertisement was a practical matter, the position of the first advertisement was strategic.  It proclaimed, “THIS DAY PUBLISHED, (And Sold byEDES & GILL in Queen-Street.)… EDES & GILL’S NORTH-AMERICAN ALMANACK For the Year of our Lord1769.”  Edes and Gill happened to be the printers of the Boston-Gazette.  While most advertisements did not appear in any particular order, this advertisement for an almanac that they published and sold occupied a privileged place on the first page.  After the masthead, it was the first item that readers glimpsed, increasing the likelihood that prospective customers would notice it.

As part of their marketing effort, Edes and Gill inflected their advertisement with news.  They provided a general overview of the contents of the almanac, a standard practice in such advertisements, but made special note that it included “The CHARTER of the Province of Massachusetts-Bay; granted by King WILLIAM and Queen MARY.—Together with the Explanatory Charter, granted by His Majesty King GEORGE the First.” The printers then added an editorial note:  “[ThisCHARTER, tho’ not more esteem’d bysimple ones than anOLD ALMANACK, has always been highly esteem’d by wise, sensible & honest Men.  It is the Basis of the civil Constitution of the Province, and should be often readAT THIS TIME, when the Rights and Liberties declared in it, are said to beinvaded.]”  Edes and Gill harnessed the current political situation as they attempted to sell their almanac.  They knew that many prospective customers resented the Townshend Act and the quartering of troops in Boston.  In turn, they offered a resource that allowed them simultaneously to become better informed of their rights and express their own views through the act of purchasing Edes and Gill’s almanac over any of the many alternatives.

The placement of their advertisement as the first item on the first page was only part of Edes and Gill’s strategy.  In addition to the usual strategies for promoting almanacs, they incorporated content and commentary that addressed the unfolding imperial crisis.  By linking politics to the consumption of their almanac, they aimed to increase sales as well a produce a better informed populace.

Slavery Advertisements Published November 14, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of November 11-17, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Kaylen McClarey (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Nov 14 - Boston Evening-Post Slavery 1
Boston Evening-Post (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - Boston Evening-Post Slavery 2
Boston Evening-Post (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - Boston Evening-Post Slavery 3
Boston Evening-Post (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 1
Boston-Gazette (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 2
Boston-Gazette (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 3
Boston-Gazette (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - Connecticut Courant Slavery 1
Connecticut Courant (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - Massachusetts Gazette Green and Russell Slavery 1
Massachusetts Gazette [Green & Russell] (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Slavery 1
New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - New-York Gazette Weekly Post-Boy Slavery 1
New-York Gazette: Or, the Weekly Post-Boy (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - New-York Gazette Weekly Post-Boy Slavery 2
New-York Gazette: Or, the Weekly Post-Boy (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - New-York Gazette Weekly Post-Boy Slavery 3
New-York Gazette: Or, the Weekly Post-Boy (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - Newport Mercury Slavery 1
Newport Mercury (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 1
South-Carolina Gazette (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 2
South-Carolina Gazette (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 3
South-Carolina Gazette (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 4
South-Carolina Gazette (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 5
South-Carolina Gazette (November 14, 1768).

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Nov 14 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 6
South-Carolina Gazette (November 14, 1768).