Summary of Slavery Advertisements Published January 14-20, 1768

These tables indicate how many advertisements for slaves appeared in colonial American newspapers during the week of January 14-20, 1768.

Note:  These tables are as comprehensive as currently digitized sources permit, but they may not be an exhaustive account.  They includes all newspapers that have been digitized and made available via Accessible Archives, Colonial Williamsburg’s Digital Library, and Readex’s America’s Historical Newspapers.  There are several reasons some newspapers may not have been consulted:

  • Issues that are no longer extant;
  • Issues that are extant but have not yet been digitized (including the Pennsylvania Journal); and
  • Newspapers published in a language other than English (including the Wochentliche Philadelphische Staatsbote).

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Slavery Advertisements Published January 14-20, 1768:  By Date

Slavery Adverts Tables 1767 By Date Jan 14

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Slavery Advertisements Published January 14-20, 1768:  By Region

Slavery Adverts Tables 1767 By Region Jan 14

Slavery Advertisements Published January 20, 1768

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.  Daily updates also available on Twitter: @SlaveAdverts250.

Jan 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 1
Georgia Gazette (January 20, 1768).

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Jan 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 2
Georgia Gazette (January 20, 1768).

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Jan 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 3
Georgia Gazette (January 20, 1768).

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Jan 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 4
Georgia Gazette (January 20, 1768).

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Jan 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 5
Georgia Gazette (January 20, 1768).

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Jan 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 6
Georgia Gazette (January 20, 1768).

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Jan 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 7
Georgia Gazette (January 20, 1768).

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Jan 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 8
Georgia Gazette (January 20, 1768).

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Jan 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 9
Georgia Gazette (January 20, 1768).

January 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jan 19 - 1:19:1768 South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

“A WELL assorted stock of Goods, consisting of most articles imported into this province.”

In their advertisement in the January 19, 1768, edition of the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal, Nowell and Lord incorporated many of the most common marketing strategies deployed by merchants and shopkeepers in eighteenth-century America. The format of their advertisement, like the appeals, would have been familiar to readers. Like many of their competitors in Charleston and throughout the colonies, Nowell and Lord composed a list-style advertisement that revealed the range of goods they stocked, from “Irish and Kentish sheeting” to “leather caps” to “blue and white earthen ware.”

In and of itself, this format demonstrated the veracity of one of their appeals to potential customers: consumer choice. The partners reiterated that their patrons could choose the items that matched their needs, desires, tastes, and budgets throughout their advertisement. First, they described their inventory as “A WELL assorted stock of Goods,” proclaiming that it included “most articles imported into this province.” In other words, customers were unlikely to find merchandise in other shops that Nowell and Lord did not also carry. To underscore the variety they offered, the partners promoted their “choice assortment of cutlery” midway through the advertisement. They also made a point of noting that the list they printed in the newspaper was not exhaustive; instead, they also carried “many other articles too tedious to enumerate.” Customers would delight in the number of choices available to them when they visited Nowell and Lord’s shop.

In addition to consumer choice, the shopkeepers also made appeals to price and fashion. For instance, they stressed that they sold their merchandise “remarkably low.” To make their wares even more affordable, they offered “credit to the first of December 1768.” When it came to textiles for making garments, they informed readers that they imported “the newest patterns,” allowing customers to impress their friends and acquaintances by keeping up with current fashions in other parts of the empire.

Nowell and Lord deployed consumer choice as the central marketing strategy in their advertisement, but they supplemented that appeal with assurances about price and fashion. To sell their merchandise, they replicated methods used by countless other advertisers throughout the colonies. That so many merchants and shopkeepers consistently relied on the same strategies testifies to the power they believed those strategies possessed to entice and influence colonial consumers.

Slavery Advertisements Published January 19, 1768

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.  Daily updates also available on Twitter: @SlaveAdverts250.

Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 1
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 2
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 3
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 4
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 5
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 6
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 7
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 8
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 9
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 10
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 11
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 12
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 13
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 15
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

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Jan 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 14
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (January 19, 1768).

January 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jan 18 - 1:18:1768 Pennsylvania Chronicle
Pennsylvania Chronicle (January 18, 1768).

“THE Publisher of this Paper … shall ever esteem it his Duty to serve and oblige them.”

As was his privilege as the printer and publisher, William Goddard placed his advertisement first among those inserted in the January 18, 1768, edition of the Pennsylvania Chronicle, which happened to be issue “NUMB. 53” of its publication. The newspaper had just completed its first full year! Goddard used the occasion for reflecting on publication and distribution during the previous year and promoting the newspaper, especially certain improvements, as he continued to supply the public with new issues.

Goddard opened his advertisement with an expression of gratitude to subscribers and other readers for their “generous Encouragement,” especially recommendations for “the Improvement of his Paper.” He pledged to continue serving them “to the utmost of his Ability” and offered “Proof” that he listened to their suggestions. He pledged to continue publication “upon the same extensive Plan” in terms of content and schedule, but planned to alter the dimensions of each issue to “Quarto Size … which will render it much more convenient … to his kind Readers and Friends.” Goddard suggested that the smaller size would make the issues much more manageable for reading than the broadsheet issues distributed by competitors. He requested that potential subscribers enthusiastic about this modification “transmit their Names and Places of Abode, as soon as possible” so he could print sufficient copies to meet demand for future issues.

Goddard also acknowledged that the Pennsylvania Chronicle had faltered at various times during its first year of publication. He noted that he had experienced difficulty “obtaining faithful and capable Journeymen” to work in his printing office. As a result he had hired “the most inartifical of the Profession … which made it impossible for him to execute or dispatch the Paper in the Manner he could have wished.” Goddard resolved to improve on that. He had just hired, “at a great Expence, a regular and valuable Set of Hands” with the necessary skill and experience that would allow him to publish and deliver the newspaper “with much greater Regularity and Expedition.”

The publisher concluded by offering premiums to his customers. Realizing that some had “preserved the Paper for binding” rather than discarding issues after reading them, he promised to issue a title page and print a notice “when it is ready to be delivered.” He also proposed, but did not promise, a table of contents, “if Time permits.” He also offered back issues for free, allowing anyone who had misplaced one to complete the set before sending it off to the binder. In making it possible for readers to compile complete runs of the first year of publication Goddard also encouraged them to continue to purchase subsequent issues in order to maintain their collections.

All in all, Goddard proclaimed that the Pennsylvania Chronicle had experienced a good first year. Yet he also proposed improvements that would allow his newspaper to compete with the Pennsylvania Gazette and the Pennsylvania Journal, both of which had been published in Philadelphia for decades. He acknowledged some of the difficulties that had an impact on serving customers to the best of his ability, but bookended that portion of his advertisement with plans to publish a more convenient size at the start and premiums, both title pages and back issues, at the conclusion. Goddard knew that colonists passed newspapers from hand to hand, sharing issues beyond just the subscribers. As he commenced a new year of publication, he worked to retain his initial subscribers as well as attract new subscribers who previously read copies acquired from others.

Slavery Advertisements Published January 18, 1768

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.  Daily updates also available on Twitter: @SlaveAdverts250.

Jan 18 - Boston Evening-Post Slavery 1
Boston Evening-Post (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - Boston Post-Boy Slavery 1
Boston Post-Boy (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 1
Boston-Gazette (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 2
Boston-Gazette (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 3
Boston-Gazette (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - New-York Gazette Weekly Post-Boy Slavery 1
New-York Gazette: Or, the Weekly Post-Boy (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - New-York Mercury Slavery 1
New-York Mercury (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - New-York Mercury Slavery 2
New-York Mercury (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - Pennsylvania Chronicle Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Chronicle (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - South Carolina Gazette Slavery 1
South Carolina Gazette (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - South Carolina Gazette Slavery 2
South Carolina Gazette (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - South Carolina Gazette Slavery 3
South Carolina Gazette (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - South Carolina Gazette Slavery 4
South Carolina Gazette (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - South Carolina Gazette Slavery 5
South Carolina Gazette (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - South Carolina Gazette Slavery 6
South Carolina Gazette (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - South Carolina Gazette Slavery 7
South Carolina Gazette (January 18, 1768).

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Jan 18 - South Carolina Gazette Slavery 8
South Carolina Gazette (January 18, 1768).

Happy Birthday, Benjamin Franklin!

Today is an important day for specialists in early American print culture, for Benjamin Franklin was born on January 17, 1706 (January 6, 1705, Old Style), in Boston.  Among his many other accomplishments, Franklin is known as the “Father of American Advertising.”  Although I have argued elsewhere that this title should more accurately be bestowed upon Mathew Carey (in my view more prolific and innovative in the realm of advertising as a printer, publisher, and advocate of marketing), I recognize that Franklin deserves credit as well.  Franklin is often known as “The First American,” so it not surprising that others should rank him first among the founders of advertising in America.

benjamin-franklin
Benjamin Franklin (Joseph Siffred Duplessis, ca. 1785).  National Portrait Gallery.

Franklin purchased the Pennsylvania Gazette in 1729.  In the wake of becoming printer, he experimented with the visual layout of advertisements that appeared in the weekly newspaper, incorporating significantly more white space and varying font sizes in order to better attract readers’ and potential customers’ attention.  Advertising flourished in the Pennsylvania Gazette, which expanded from two to four pages in part to accommodate the greater number of commercial notices.

jan-17-pennsylvania-gazette-19-161736
Advertisements with white space, varying sizes of font, capitals and italics, and a woodcut from Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette (December 9-16, 1736).

Many historians of the press and print culture in early America have noted that Franklin became wealthy and retired as a printer in favor of a multitude of other pursuits in part because of the revenue he collected from advertising.  Others, especially David Waldstreicher, have underscored that this wealth was amassed through participation in the colonial slave trade.  The advertisements for goods and services featured in the Pennsylvania Gazette included announcements about buying and selling slaves as well as notices offering rewards for runaways.

jan-17-pennsylvania-gazette-slave-19-161736
An advertisement for slaves from Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette (December 9-16, 1736).

In 1741 Franklin published one of colonial America’s first magazines, The General Magazine and Historical Chronicle, for all the British Plantations in America (which barely missed out on being the first American magazine, a distinction earned by Franklin’s competitor, Andrew Bradford, with The American Magazine or Monthly View of the Political State of the British Colonies).  The magazine lasted only a handful of issues, but that was sufficient for Franklin to become the first American printer to include an advertisement in a magazine (though advertising did not become a standard part of magazine publication until special advertising wrappers were developed later in the century — and Mathew Carey was unarguably the master of that medium).

general-magazine
General Magazine and Historical Chronicle, For all the British Plantations in America (January 1741).  Library of Congress.

In 1744 Franklin published an octavo-sized Catalogue of Choice and Valuable Books, including 445 entries.  This is the first known American book catalogue aimed at consumers (though the Library Company of Philadelphia previously published catalogs listing their holdings in 1733, 1735, and 1741).  Later that same year, Franklin printed a Catalogue of Books to Be Sold at Auction.

Franklin pursued advertising through many media in eighteenth-century America, earning recognition as one of the founders of American advertising.  Happy 312th birthday, Benjamin Franklin!