Slavery Advertisements Published October 14, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of October 14-20, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Marny Fappiano (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Oct 14 - New-London Gazette Slavery 1
New-London Gazette (October 14, 1768).

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Oct 14 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 1
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (October 14, 1768).

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Oct 14 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 2
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (October 14, 1768).

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Oct 14 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 3
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (October 14, 1768).

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Oct 14 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 4
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (October 14, 1768).

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Oct 14 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 5
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (October 14, 1768).

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Oct 14 - South-Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 6
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (October 14, 1768).

 

October 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Oct 13 - 10:13:1768 Massachusetts Gazette Draper
Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (October 13, 1768).
“All Persons shall be as well served by Letter as if present.”

In the late 1760s Joshua Blanchard operated a “Wine-Cellar near the Market” in Boston. He sold “Choice Sterling Madeira … and all other Sorts of Wine” in a variety of quantities, “by the Pipe, Quarter-Cask, or in Bottles by the Groce or Dozen” or any other measure “as may suit the Buyer.” In addition, he also sold “West India and New-England Rum.” Transporting, repackaging, and selling wine and spirits required special skills and attention compared to textiles, housewares, hardware, and many other imported goods frequently promoted in newspaper advertisements. To that end, Blanchard informed prospective customers of the care exhibited in distributing his wine in the marketplace.

Blanchard envisioned several sorts of customers. He addressed “Gentlemen of the Town, Masters of Vessels, and all Persons going abroad,” promising them that he offered the “best Kinds” of wine. He also assured prospective customers about the packaging, noting that they “may depend on having their Wine put up in the best Manner.” There was no need to worry about spilling or spoiling that resulted from the work undertaken at Blanchard’s wine cellar to transfer wine from its original casks to new bottles or barrels of various sizes. Blanchard’s emphasis on quality extended beyond the product itself; it included his efforts in distributing the wine.

In addition to serving customers in the busy port, Blanchard invited “Gentlemen in the Country, Inn-keepers, and all other Persons” to send orders to his wine cellar. Transactions did not need to take place face to face. Instead, customers “shall be as well served by Letter as if present.” In other words, Blanchard provided a form of mail order service. That made his attention to quality an even more important marketing appeal. He first needed to assure prospective customers that his wine and rum would survive transport without incident before presenting the option of delivering it in response to orders placed in letters. Blanchard underscored “Care & Fidelity” in the second half of his advertisement, in relation to his work as a broker, but that phrase also applied to treatment of the products that passed through his wine cellar as well.

Slavery Advertisements Published October 13, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of October 7-13, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Thomas “Tommy” Daley (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Oct 13 - Massachusetts Gazette Draper Slavery 1
Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Massachusetts Gazette Draper Slavery 2
Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Massachusetts Gazette Draper Slavery 3
Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - New-York Journal Slavery 1
New-York Journal (October 13, 1768).

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Oct 13 - New-York Journal Slavery 2
New-York Journal (October 13, 1768).

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Oct 13 - Pennsylvania Gazette Postscript Slavery 1
Postscript to the Pennsylvania Gazette (October 13, 1768).

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Oct 13 - Pennsylvania Gazette Postscript Slavery 2
Postscript to the Pennsylvania Gazette (October 13, 1768).

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Oct 13 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Gazette (October 13, 1768).

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Oct 13 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (October 13, 1768).

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Oct 13 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (October 13, 1768).

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Oct 13 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement Slavery 3
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (October 13, 1768).

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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon](October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon](October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon](October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon](October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon](October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 7
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 8
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Rind (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 7
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 8
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 9
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 10
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 11
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 12
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 13
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).
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Oct 13 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 14
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (October 13, 1768).

October 12

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Oct 12 - 10:12:1768 Georgia Gazette
Georgia Gazette (October 12, 1768).

“INGLIS and HALL, Have just imported, In the INDUSTRY, FURSE, from BRISTOL.”

When Inglis and Hall placed an advertisement in the October 12, 1768, edition of the Georgia Gazette they adopted formulaic language that often appeared in other advertisements. The partners informed prospective customers that they “have just imported” a variety of goods from London and Bristol. Like many other colonial merchants and shopkeepers, Inglis and Hall reported which ship had transported their goods across the Atlantic: “the GEORGIA PACKET, ANDERSON, from LONDON” and “the INDUSTRY, FURSE, from BRISTOL.” This allowed readers to determine for themselves that Inglis and Hall did indeed stock new merchandise. Many may have been aware of which vessels recently arrived in port, but all could read the shipping news that appeared elsewhere in the newspaper.

Inglis and Hall’s advertisement appeared on the second page of the October 12 issue, opposite the list of ships ‘ENTERED INWARDS at the CUSTOM-HOUSE,” those “ENTERED OUTWARDS,” and others that had “CLEARED” the port. The shipping news indicated that the “Ship Georgia Packet, George Anderson” from London “ENTERED INWARDS” on October 10. The Industry was not listed, but it was still in port, having ‘ENTERED INWARDS” on September 30 according to the October 5 edition.

Given the time required to set the type and print both sides of the newspaper on a hand-operated press, Inglis and Hall must have submitted the copy for their advertisement to James Johnston at the printing office in Savannah immediately upon the arrival of Captain Anderson and the Georgia Packet. The shipping news bolstered their claim that they “have just imported” a variety of goods. In other instances, merchants and shopkeepers ran advertisements for weeks or months, never updating them. The appeal to having “just imported” merchandise became outdated, even if the list of goods available for sale remained accurate. Readers could assess that particular appeal: sometimes an inventory described as “just imported” had been lingering on the shelves for quite some time. Consumers interested in the newest goods, including the current fashions from London, had to be aware that advertisers deployed the phrase “just imported” with little attention to the passage of time over the run of their advertisements. Usually accurate when an advertisement first appeared, that description did not disappear until advertisers discontinued their advertisements.

Slavery Advertisements Published October 12, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of October 7-13, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Thomas “Tommy” Daley (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Oct 12 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 1
Georgia Gazette (October 12, 1768).

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Oct 12 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 2
Georgia Gazette (October 12, 1768).

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Oct 12 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 3
Georgia Gazette (October 12, 1768).

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Oct 12 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 4
Georgia Gazette (October 12, 1768).

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Oct 12 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 5
Georgia Gazette (October 12, 1768).

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Oct 12 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 6
Georgia Gazette (October 12, 1768).

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Oct 12 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 7
Georgia Gazette (October 12, 1768).

October 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Oct 11 - 10:11:1768 South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal
Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (October 11, 1768).

“Many other useful articles, too tedious to mention.”

John Edwards and Company advertised an array of goods in the supplement that accompanied the October 11, 1768, edition of the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal. They emphasized abundance and consumer choice in the language deployed to describe the textiles available at their store on Tradd Street: “A LARGE QUANTITY of exceeding good WHITE PLAINS,” “a large assortment of Irish shirting and sheeting linen,” “a choice quantity of oznaburgs,” “a variety of checks, drawboys, and cotton velvets.” They applied the same appeals to other merchandise as well, including “an assortment of womens and childrens leather [shoes]” and “several very fashionable compleat sets of queens, or cream colour ware.” After listing dozens of items in their inventory, Edwards and Company concluded by underscoring the intertwined themes of abundance and choice, stressing that they carried “many other useful articles, too tedious to enumerate.” Rather than “tedious” perhaps the partners considered it too expensive to purchase additional space to list even more merchandise. They had made their pitch and their final appeal suggested prospective customers would discover an even more extensive selection when visiting their shop.

Other merchants and shopkeepers joined Edwards and Company in making general statements about the vast array of goods they sold. Godfrey and Gadsden, for instance, listed even more items than Edwards and Company yet also stated that carried “many other articles.” Mary King, a milliner, named about two dozen items associated with her trade but also promised “a variety of other articles.” Mansell, Corbett, and Roberts concluded their list-style advertisement with “&c. &c.” Dawson and Walter did the same. Not to be outdone, Alexander Gillon published a list twice as long and with an additional “&c.” at the end: “&c. &c. &c.” Through invoking the eighteenth-century abbreviation for et cetera, these entrepreneurs challenged readers to imagine what else they sold. Choosing not “to enumerate” all of their goods allowed advertisers to incite curiosity among prospective customers. They named enough to get readers thinking about the possibilities without eliminating any options outright. Advertisers offered consumers extensive choices, but when it came to tallying all of those choices in the public prints they often opted for a version of “less is more.” They accounted for just enough to stimulate interest and then promised even more, inviting prospective customers to see for themselves when visiting their shops.

Slavery Advertisements Published October 11, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

During the week of October 7-13, 2018, the Slavery Adverts 250 Project is guest curated by Thomas “Tommy” Daley (2019), a History major at Assumption College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Oct 11 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 1
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (October 11, 1768).

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Oct 11 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 2
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (October 11, 1768).

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Oct 11 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 3
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (October 11, 1768).

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Oct 11 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (October 11, 1768).

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Oct 11 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (October 11, 1768).