Slavery Advertisements Published July 26, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 1
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 2
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 3
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 4
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 5
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 8
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 6
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 7
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Supplement Slavery 3
Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Supplement Slavery 4
Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Supplement Slavery 5
Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Supplement Slavery 6
Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

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Jul 26 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Supplement Slavery 7
Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 26, 1768).

July 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jul 25 - Connecticut Courant 7:25:1768
Connecticut Courant (July 25, 1768).

“RUN-AWAY.”

When Ephraim Smith, “an assigned Servant,” ran away from Dr. Eliot Rawson of Middletown in the summer of 1768, the doctor placed an advertisement in the Connecticut Courant in hopes that someone would “take up said Runaway, and secure him in any of his Majesty’s Goals.” Once Smith had been captured and committed to jail, Rawson pledged to pay a reward as well as other expenses. One aspect of Rawson’s advertisement especially distinguished it from other notices concerning runaway servants, apprentices, and slaves. The headline featured unique typography, the word “RUN-AWAY” in capital letters printed upside down.

Was this intentional? Or was it merely an error made by the compositor? If it was an error, nobody associated with the runaway notice – not the advertiser, not the compositor, not the printers of the Connecticut Courant – considered it consequential enough to remedy. The advertisement ran for three weeks, the standard time specified in rate structure listed in the colophon, before being discontinued. Throughout its entire run it likely attracted attention as a result of the upside down text that introduced the description of Smith and the reward offered by Rawson.

The compositor certainly had opportunities to correct the error. The advertisement first appeared in the July 11 edition, at the top of the center column and immediately below the masthead on the front page. It moved to different positions on the fourth page in the next two issues, indicating that the compositor viewed and handled the type.

Even if the headline initially appeared upside down as a mistake, perhaps everyone involved considered it a fortuitous one and intentionally chose not to reset the type in the first line of the advertisement. After all, it made Rawson’s notice difficult to miss on a page that consisted almost entirely of densely text. An advertisement for a runaway servant might not have merited a second glance by readers who had previously encountered it in another edition, but the incongruity of the upside down text in all capitals and a larger font demanded subsequent notice. It forcefully reminded readers to keep their eyes open for the delinquent Smith when they might otherwise have passed over the advertisement as old news.

Whether intentional or an error, the unique headline produced benefits that relied on the visual elements of the advertisement rather than the copy, making it unnecessary or undesirable to flip the headline to the proper orientation in subsequent iterations of the advertisement. Especially in the absence of visual images, typography played an important role in the quest to have readers take note of newspaper advertisements.

Slavery Advertisements Published July 25, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 25 - Boston Chronicle Slavery 1
Boston Chronicle (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Boston Evening-Post Slavery 1
Boston Evening-Post (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Boston Evening-Post Slavery 2
Boston Evening-Post (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Boston Post-Boy Slavery 1
Boston Post-Boy (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 1
Boston-Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 2
Boston-Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 3
Boston-Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Supplement Slavery 3
Supplement to the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Newport Mercury Slavery 1
Newport Mercury (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Newport Mercury Slavery 2
Newport Mercury (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Pennsylvania Chronicle Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Chronicle (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Pennsylvania Chronicle Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Chronicle (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - Pennsylvania Chronicle Slavery 3
Pennsylvania Chronicle (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 1
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 2
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 3
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 4
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 5
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 6
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 13
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 7
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 8
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 9
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 14
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 10
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 11
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

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Jul 25 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 12
South-Carolina Gazette (July 25, 1768).

July 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week?

Jul 24 - 7:21:1768 Pennsylvania Journal
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Journal (July 21, 1768).

“PROPOSALS For Re-printing by SUBSCRIPTION.”

In the summer of 1768 James Adams, a printer in Wilmington, Delaware, advertised a product that was not yet available for sale, one that might not ever hit the market. He wished to reprint a book originally published in London, William Bates’s Harmony of the Divine Attributes in the Contrivance and Accomplishment of Man’s Redemption by the Lord Jesus Christ. Yet taking on this enterprise would be a significant investment for the printer, so he first sought to gauge interest and incite demand by issuing a subscription notice.

Printers throughout the colonies regularly distributed subscription notices before committing to publishing books. In them, they described the proposed publication, both the contents and the material aspects, and asked prospective customers interested in purchasing the book to become subscribers who paid a portion in advance and the remainder upon delivery. For instance, the extensive subtitle of Harmony of the Divine Attributes provided a general outline – “How the WISDOM, MERCY, JUSTICE, HOLINESS, POWER and TRUTH, of GOD are glorified in that Great and Blessed Work” – for the twenty-three sections of the book. Furthermore, it included an index to guide readers to specific topics. In terms of the material qualities of the book, Adams stated that it “shall be printed on a good letter and paper, and will be contained in one large volume octavo, making upwards of five hundred pages.” Adams invited potential subscribers to contact him for even more information, stating that “a plan or contents of the work may be had gratis.” The printer had generated additional marketing materials to supplement the subscription notices that appeared in newspapers.

Adams’s subscription notice was not the only one in the July 21, 1768, edition of the Pennsylvania Journal. Two others sought subscribers for John Thompson’s Explication of the Shorter Catechism and John Warden’s System of Revealed Religion. Each listed subscription agents in more than one town. In addition to accepting subscriptions in Wilmington, Adams had agents in two much larger cities, Philadelphia and New York. Not all subscription notices resulted in publications, but Adams’s reprint of Harmony of the Divine Attributes eventually went to the press in 1771. A variety of challenges may have slowed down the production process, but the amount of time that lapsed between Adams issuing his subscription notice and finally printing the book suggests that attracting sufficient subscribers was among those challenges. Distributing subscription notices helped the printer incite sufficient demand to publish an American edition of Harmony of the Divine Attributes, but those notices did not guarantee success. All the same, responses to the subscription notices provided valuable information about whether and when Adams should move forward with the proposed project.

July 23

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jul 23 - 7:23:1768 Providence Gazette
Providence Gazette (July 23, 1768).

“A most neat and general Assortment of SPRING and SUMMER GOODS.”

It would have been practically impossible for regular readers of the Providence Gazette not to know something about the commercial activities of Joseph Russell and William Russell in the late 1760s. The Russells were prolific advertisers. They saturated the pages of their local newspaper with a series of notices that made their names and merchandise familiar to prospective customers.

For instance, the Russells placed three advertisements in the July 23, 1768, edition of the Providence Gazette. One promoted their “most neat and general Assortment of SPRING and SUMMER GOODS.” Another offered a house for rent, but concluded with an announcement concerning textiles, tea, and spices they sold. The third called on fellow colonists to deliver potash to the Russells.

The three appeared in a single column on the final page of the July 23 issue. It was the fifth issue that featured all three advertisements and the third consecutive issue in which they appeared one after another, though their position on the page changed from week to week depending on the needs of the compositor. By placing so many advertisements and so frequently, the Russells made it difficult to overlook their activities in the colonial marketplace.

The first of their advertisements was especially notable for its longevity. The “(23)” inserted on the final line indicated that it first ran in issue number 223, published April 16. Since then, it had maintained a constant presence in the Providence Gazette, appearing every week for fifteen consecutive weeks before being discontinued. Throughout most of that time the Russells simultaneously published at least one other advertisement in the Providence Gazette. The notice concerning a house for rent and assorted goods for sale first appeared on July 25, replacing another advertisement that exclusively promoted consumer goods that ran for seven weeks beginning in May.

Most advertisers usually ran notices for only three or four weeks in newspapers published in other cities. Those who advertised in the Providence Gazette tended to run their advertisements for even longer (which may suggest the publishers offered discounted rates in order to generate content and revenue). Still, the Russells’ “SPRING and SUMMER GOODS” notice enjoyed an exceptionally long run, signaling that they wanted to be certain that readers saw and remembered their advertisement. Combining it with other notices further increased the name recognition they achieved.

July 22

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jul 22 - 7:22:1768 Connecticut Journal
Connecticut Journal (July 22, 1768).

“John Astle, Stay-Maker, & Taylor, directly from London.”

When John Astle, a tailor and staymaker, set up shop in New Haven in the summer of 1768, he placed an advertisement in the Connecticut Journal to inform prospective clients that he made and repaired all sorts of garments, including “Cloaks, and Huzzas,” “Riding-Habits for Ladies,” and corsets (stays). He also pledged to deliver exemplary customer service: “Whoever will be kind enough to favour him with their Custom, may depend upon the best Usage in his Power.”

In the process of introducing himself to readers he hoped would become customers, Astle also noted his origins. He stated that he had arrived in New Haven “directly from London.” (The tailor may have requested that “London” appear in italics to garner more attention, but more likely the compositor made this decision without consulting the advertiser.) In so doing, he adopted a common marketing strategy, one that was especially popular among members of the garment trades. The frequency of styles changing dramatically accelerated in the eighteenth century as part of the consumer revolution. Colonists looked to London, the cosmopolitan center of the empire, for the latest fashions. Some advertisers explicitly stated that they made or sold garments, housewares, and other goods according to the most current tastes. Others asserted connections to London or other places in England or continental Europe as a means of suggesting that they had acquired both skill in crafting apparel and knowledge of the newest fashions.

Stating that they were “from London,” however, left room for interpretation. That description did not specify how recently advertisers had worked in London or migrated to the colonies. Astle apparently realized that some prospective clients would be skeptical. To answer any objections, he modified the standard phrase “from London” to “directly from London,” communicating to readers that he had not been working in the English provinces or other colonies immediately prior to arriving in New Haven. Months or years had not passed since he had actively made garments in the city at the center of the empire. Instead, potential customers could depend on him having knowledge of current styles and outfitting them accordingly. Many eighteenth-century advertisements deployed formulaic phrases, but advertisers like Astle sometimes modified them to suit their needs and deliver better marketing appeals.

Slavery Advertisements Published July 22, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 22 - New-Hampshire Gazette Slavery 1
New-Hampshire Gazette (July 22, 1768).

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Jul 22 - New-London Gazette Slavery 1
New-London Gazette (July 22, 1768).

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Jul 22 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 1
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 22, 1768).

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Jul 22 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 2
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 22, 1768).

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Jul 22 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 3
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 22, 1768).

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Jul 22 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 4
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 22, 1768).

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Jul 22 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 5
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 22, 1768).

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Jul 22 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 6
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 22, 1768).

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Jul 22 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 7
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 22, 1768).

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Jul 22 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 8
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 22, 1768).

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Jul 22 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 9
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 22, 1768).

July 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jul 21 - 7:21:1768 Virginia Gazette Rind
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (July 21, 1768).
“I shall … give relief in all sicknesses, even the most desperate.”

When De Lacoudre, a “FRENCH Doctor,” settled in Norfolk in the summer of 1768, he placed an advertisement in Rind’s Virginia Gazette to inform readers of the services he provided. “I possess the most efficacious remedy,” he boasted, “to cure some sicknesses with which the country appears to be much afflicted,” especially “scurvy distempers.” In addition, he claimed that he could “cure distempers of the eyes, ears, and deafness, couching or taking away cataracts, though the person may have been deprived of sight or hearing for many years.” Furthermore, De Lacoudre promoted his “infallible remedy for all sorts of wounds, and scorbutick, schirrous, and scrophulous ulcers of all sorts.” To top it all off, he was qualified to perform “all sorts of operations in surgery and man midwifery,” including when women were “in imminent danger of life.” The doctor could even make diagnoses and recommend treatments from afar. He instructed those who lived “too great a distance” from Norfolk to send their urine. In turn, “they shall have proper advice.”

De Lacoudre did not merely announce that he possessed these various abilities. Considering that he was new to the colony and the community of readers and prospective patients did not know him or have previous experience seeking his advice and remedies, the doctor first listed his credentials. He began with his education, indicating that he bad been a “pupil of Doctors Guerin and Morant, both members of the Royal Academy of Paris and Montpelier, Physicians and Surgeons to the King of France.” Upon receiving that training, he performed operations in several countries, “authorized by certificates, from Princes, Generals, Governors, and City Corporations.” De Lacoudre expected one certificate in particular to impress the residents of Virginia, the one issued “from his Britannick Majesty, King George III.” Developing relationships of trust with patients required time. Until he had time to interact with patients and establish a reputation among Virginians, De Lacoudre expected his credentials would offer reassurance about his skills as a physician. This was a common strategy among advertisers who provided medical services, especially those who recently migrated from Europe. They sought to impress prospective patients by providing extensive descriptions of their training, experience, and approbation by nobles and other elites on the other side of the Atlantic.

Summary of Slavery Advertisements Published July 15-21

These tables indicate how many advertisements for slaves appeared in colonial American newspapers during the week of July 15-21, 1768.

Note:  These tables are as comprehensive as currently digitized sources permit, but they may not be an exhaustive account.  They includes all newspapers that have been digitized and made available via Accessible Archives, Colonial Williamsburg’s Digital Library, and Readex’s America’s Historical Newspapers.  There are several reasons some newspapers may not have been consulted:

  • Issues that are no longer extant;
  • Issues that are extant but have not yet been digitized (including the Pennsylvania Journal); and
  • Newspapers published in a language other than English (including the Wochentliche Philadelphische Staatsbote).

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Slavery Advertisements Published July 15-21, 1768:  By Date

Slavery Adverts Tables 1768 By Date Jul 15

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Slavery Advertisements Published July 15-21, 1768:  By Region

Slavery Adverts Tables 1768 By Region Jul 15

 

Slavery Advertisements Published July 21, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 21 - Boston Weekly News-Letter Slavery 1
Boston Weekly News-Letter (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Massachusetts Gazette Draper Slavery 1
Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - New-York Journal Slavery 2
Supplement to the New-York Journal (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - New-York Journal Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the New-York Journal (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Gazette (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Pennsylvania Gazette Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Pennsylvania Gazette Supplement 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Gazette (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Journal (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Journal (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 3
Pennsylvania Journal (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Pennsylvania Journal Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Journal (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Pennsylvania Journal Slavery 6
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Journal (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Pennsylvania Journal Supplement Slavery 2
Supplement to the Pennsylvania Journal (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 6
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Purdie and Dixon Slavery 7
Virginia Gazette [Purdie & Dixon] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 1
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 2
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 3
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 4
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (July 21, 1768).

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Jul 21 - Virginia Gazette Rind Slavery 5
Virginia Gazette [Rind] (July 21, 1768).