July 20

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jul 20 - 7:20:1768 Georgia Gazette
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

“Said Winter has all sorts of garden seeds to dispose of.”

Robert Winter advertised “all sorts of garden seeds” almost as an afterthought in a notice he placed in the July 20, 1768, edition of the Georgia Gazette. Winter served as the caretaker for several gardens – Pleasant Oak, Mulberry Hill, and Spring Gardens – that belonged to Dr. James Cuthbert. In the course of performing his duties he noticed a series of robberies committed by “several very indiscreet persons.” In turn, the caretaker took measures to prevent further thefts on the premises. He also turned to the public prints to warn fellow colonists about those measures, proclaiming that “he has guns, dogs, and other snares laid for such as may trespass there for the future.” Furthermore, should he catch anyone defacing any of the gardens Winter was “resolved to bring them to justice. The caretaker imagined a variety of possible suspects, including “apprentices, servants, and negroes.” He requested that “masters will caution” them “against the like errors.”

Only after signing his name to this notice did the caretaker insert an additional line that deviated from his primary purpose of preventing further robberies: “Said Winter has all sorts of garden seeds to dispose of.” Compared to extensive advertisements placed by others who specialized in selling seeds, this portion of Winter’s notice was exceptionally short. He did not elaborate on any of the varieties he offered for sale. He assumed that potential customers were already familiar with the gardens he tended and did not need further explanation. Indirectly, the series of robberies indicated a certain level of demand for the plants that sprang from his seeds.

Winter put virtually no effort into marketing his garden seeds. He merely made an appeal to choice by noting that he sold “all sorts.” Yet he did follow another convention common to many eighteenth-century advertisements. Often colonists placed notices with two purposes. In many cases, the primary purpose revolved around some sort of announcement, such as estate notices, calls to settle accounts before advertisers left town, or, in this instance, cautioning robbers against further attempts. Having purchased space in the newspaper, some advertisers opted to pursue a secondary purpose: selling consumer goods and services. Having attracted attention for their primary purpose, but not wishing to distract from it too much, they appended short invitations for readers to make purchases, whether the contents of the rest of the notice applied to them or not.

Winter’s story of “guns, dogs, and other snares” intended to ward off the “several very indiscreet persons” who “made a practice of robbing the gardens” he tended likely garnered interest among readers solely because it was so different that the rest of the contents among the advertisements in the Georgia Gazette. The caretaker seized that opportunity to encourage sales of his seeds.

Slavery Advertisements Published July 20, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 1
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

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Jul 20 - 7:20:1768 Georgia Gazette
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

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Jul 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 2
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

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Jul 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 3
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

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Jul 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 4
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

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Jul 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 5
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

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Jul 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 6
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

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Jul 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 7
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

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Jul 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 8
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

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Jul 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 9
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

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Jul 20 - Georgia Gazette Slavery 10
Georgia Gazette (July 20, 1768).

July 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jul 19 - 7:19:1768 South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

“The BARBER’s BUSINESS is carried on as usual.”

Elizabeth Butler’s advertisement in the July 19, 1768, edition of the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal demonstrates that women pursued a wide range of occupations in colonial America. Divided into two parts, Butler’s advertisement promoted two different services she provided. In the first portion, she announced that she had “good Accommodations for Boarders” who could “depend on being faithfully served, and meeting with the genteelest Treatment.” Women throughout the colonies provided such services. In that regard, Butler did not describe anything out of the ordinary. In the second portion of her advertisement, however, Butler indicated that she practiced an occupation usually reserved for men: shaving and trimming beards as well as cutting and dressing hair. “The BARBER’s BUSINESS is carried on as usual,” Butler informed prospective clients, apparently reminding many readers of the services that she apparently had already provided for some time.

When women placed newspaper advertisements for the services they provided they also indicated what was probable and what was possible for members of their sex in the marketplace. Most advertisements fell in the category of what was probable, such as those placed by milliners, schoolmistresses, and women who took in boarders. A significantly smaller number of advertisements, on the other hand, belonged to the category of what was possible. Women sometimes practiced trades considered the domain of men, such as barbering. Butler’s advertisement testifies to the flexibility sometimes exhibited in the gendering of occupations in colonial America. While women did not enter most trades in large numbers, a few did manage to carve out space for themselves without being too disruptive of social norms. They did so by remaining exceptions to expectations rather than seeking to transform generally accepted ideas about who should work in particular occupations. That Butler simultaneously pursued an occupation considered appropriate for women – operating a boardinghouse – may have reassured residents of Charleston that she sought only to stretch rather than shatter the gendered boundaries associated with barbering.

Slavery Advertisements Published July 19, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 1
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 2
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 3
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 4
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 12
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 5
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 6
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 7
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 8
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 9
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 10
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

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Jul 19 - South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal Slavery 11
South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (July 19, 1768).

July 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jul 18 - 7:18:1768 Connecticut Courant
Connecticut Courant (July 18, 1768).

Those who have Advertisements to insert in this Paper, are desired to send them … to the Printers, by Saturday Noon.”

Most eighteenth-century newspapers did not regularly publish their advertising rates, though several included calls for advertisements (along with subscriptions and job printing) alongside information about the printer and place of publication in the colophon on the final page. For instance, throughout 1768 the colophon for the Georgia Gazette read: “SAVANNAH: Printed by JAMES JOHNSTON, at the Printing-Office in Broughton-Street, where Advertisements, Letters of Intelligence, and Subscriptions for this Paper, are taken in.—Hand-Bills, Advertisements, &c. printed at the shortest Notice.” Johnston solicited advertisements for the Georgia Gazette, but did not reveal the costs for advertisers.

Among those who did use the colophon to promote the various services offered at the printing office, a few did indicate advertising rates. Green and Watson, printers of the Connecticut Courant, listed this pricing scheme in the summer of 1768: “ADVERTISEMENTS of not more than ten Lines, are taken in and inserted for Three Shillings, three Weeks, and Six Pence, for each Week after, and longer ones in Proportion.” Green and Watson gave prospective advertisers a sense of how much they could expect to pay to insert a notice in their newspaper.

Beyond the information provided in colophons and occasional notices calling on subscribers and advertisers to settle accounts, eighteenth-century printers rarely published other instructions that revealed the mechanics of advertising. Occasionally, however, some did insert additional guidance for advertisers. In the lower right corner of the first page of the July 18, 1768, edition of the Connecticut Courant, Green and Watson specified the deadline for submitting advertisements in order for them to appear in the next issue, published each week on Mondays. “Those who have Advertisements to insert in this Paper,” the printers advised, “are desired to send them (accompanied with the Pay) to the Printers, by Saturday Noon.” Green and Watson required two days notice to insert advertisements in their newspaper, allowing sufficient time for setting type and printing the next issue on a press operated by hand. Their notice indicated how quickly advertisements could be incorporated into their newspaper, yet also cautioned that advertisers needed to submit their copy in a timely fashion of they did not wish for it to be delayed by a week between issues.

Slavery Advertisements Published July 18, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 18 - Boston Chronicle Slavery 1
Boston Chronicle (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - Boston Evening-Post Slavery 1
Boston Evening-Post (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - Boston Evening-Post Slavery 2
Boston Evening-Post (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - Boston Evening-Post Supplement Slavery 1
Supplement to the Boston Evening-Post (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - Boston Post-Boy Slavery 1
Boston Post-Boy (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 1
Boston-Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - Boston-Gazette Slavery 2
Boston-Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - New-York Gazette Weekly Mercury Slavery 1
New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - Newport Mercury Slavery 1
Newport Mercury (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - Newport Mercury Slavery 2
Newport Mercury (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - Pennsylvania Chronicle Slavery 1
Pennsylvania Chronicle (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - Pennsylvania Chronicle Slavery 2
Pennsylvania Chronicle (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Additional Supplement Slavery 1
Additional Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Additional Supplement Slavery 2
Additional Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Additional Supplement Slavery 3
Additional Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Postscript Slavery 1
Postscript to the South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Postscript Slavery 2
Postscript to the South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Postscript Slavery 3
Postscript to the South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Postscript Slavery 4
Postscript to the South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Postscript Slavery 5
Postscript to the South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Postscript Slavery 6
Postscript to the South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Postscript Slavery 7
Postscript to the South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 1
South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 2
South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 3
South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 4
South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

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Jul 18 - South-Carolina Gazette Slavery 5
South-Carolina Gazette (July 18, 1768).

July 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week?

Jul 17 - 7:14:1768 Massachusetts Gazette Draper
Massachusetts Gazette [Draper] (July 14, 1768).
“He will sell without Exception, as cheap as can bough at any Shop or Store in Town.”

Consumers in Boston had many choices when it came to shopping in the busy port city in the late 1760s. Numerous merchants and shopkeepers regularly advertised in the several newspapers published in Boston. Many others ran shops without promoting their wares in the public prints. This multitude of retailers presented colonists with opportunities to engage in comparison shopping in order to find the best deals on the merchandise they wished to purchase.

William Gale attempted to streamline the process for readers of the Massachusetts Gazette. When he advertised his “general Assortment of English and India Goods” he made a bold proclamation about his prices. Gale declared that “he will sell without Exception, as cheap as can be bought at any Shop or Store in Town.” The shopkeeper likely did not expect prospective customers merely to accept his claim; he probably expected that most would visit other shops to confirm that he did indeed offer the best deals or, at the very least, competitive prices. Expecting readers to be skeptical, he intended for them to consider his shop and the potential bargains when making their decisions about which retailers to visit.

In addition to promoting low prices, Gale may have also offered price matching for customers who found better values elsewhere. If he wished to honor the promises he made in print then he would have had to lower his prices if shoppers informed him of better deals offered by his competitors. Shopkeepers and customers expected to haggle with each other, so Gale may have anticipated price matching in order to “sell without Exception, as cheap as can be bought at any Shop or Store in Town” as part of the negotiations.

Retailers and other advertisers commonly made appeals to price throughout the eighteenth century. Some simply mentioned low prices, but others, including Gale, made other claims intended to further distinguish their prices from those of others who sold similar merchandise.

July 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jul 16 - 7:16:1768 Providence Gazette
Providence Gazette (July 16, 1768).

“They have set up the CUTLERS Business in Providence.”

When Joseph Bucklin and Nicholas Clark opened a new workshop they placed an advertisement to inform prospective customers that they had “set up the CUTLERS Business in Providence.” They called on the residents of the city and its environs to support their new endeavor, explaining the benefits to both consumers and the local economy. The workshop produced “all Sorts of Cutlers Ware used in this Country,” making it unnecessary to rely on imported goods. Indeed, Bucklin and Clark condemned the shoddy cutlery exported to the colonies, a state of affairs that they suggested readers already knew all too well: “When they consider how much this Country hath been abused by bad Wares sent hither for Sale, they are but the more encouraged in their Undertaking.”

In contrast, the workmen who labored in their shop made razors, scissors, knives of various sorts, medical instruments, and “many other Articles” that were “far exceeding in Quality any thing of the Kind imported from Great-Britain.” To that end, they had hired “two Workmen from Europe, who are compleat Masters in the Business” who could “grind and put in Order all the aforementioned Articles, in the best and most expeditiopus Manner.” Bucklin and Clark were so confident of the quality of their wares that they offered a guarantee. The partners pledged that “they will warrant them to be good,” but also promised that if in the instance of any of their products “proving defective” they “will receive them again.”

Bucklin and Clark concluded with an argument simultaneously commercial and political. “It is hoped,” they stated, “that when this Country labours under the greatest Embarrassments and Difficulties, in importing the Manufactures of Great-Britain, their Business will be encouraged, and their Work preferred to such as is imported, as the whole Cost will be saved to the Country.” Bucklin and Clark asserted that the superior quality of their cutlery was only one reason that potential customers should purchase it rather than imported wares. They also declared that consumers had an obligation to make responsible choices that had both commercial and political ramifications. The colonies suffered a trade imbalance with Great Britain; purchasing domestic manufactures helped to remedy that. In addition, passing over imported goods in favor of obtaining locally produced wares made a political statement in the wake of the Townshend Act and other abuses by Parliament. Bucklin and Clark underscored that seemingly mundane decisions about which knives to purchase actually had extensive repercussions.

July 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Jul 15 - 7:15:1768 New-Hampshire Gazette
New-Hampshire Gazette (July 15, 1768).

A large Assortment of BOOKS.

Although eighteenth-century booksellers sometimes issued book catalogs, either as broadsides or pamphlets, they much more often compiled catalogs for publication as newspaper advertisements. Booksellers who also happened to publish newspapers, like Robert Fowle, took advantage of their access to the press when they wished to promote their books, stationery, and other merchandise. Such printer-booksellers exercised the privilege of determining the contents of each issue, sometimes opting to reduce other content in favor of promoting their own wares. Alternately, inserting a book catalog, even an abbreviated list of titles, among the advertisements occasionally helped to fill the pages when printers lacked other content.

Fowle proclaimed that he stocked “A large Assortment of BOOKS” at his shop next door to the printing office in Portsmouth. To demonstrate that was indeed the case, his advertisement in the July 15, 1768, edition of the New-Hampshire Gazette extended nearly an entire column and enumerated more than one-hundred titles. Such advertisements were part of a reading revolution that occurred in the eighteenth century as colonists transitioned from intensive reading of the Bible and devotional literature to extensive reading across many genres. Fowle’s list also included reference works as well as books meant for instruction. The printer-bookseller offered something for every interest or taste, including “small Books for Children.”

In some instances Fowle also promoted the material qualities of the books he sold. Some titles were “neatly bound & gilt,” making them especially attractive for display as well as reading. He offered “BIBLE of all sizes, some neatly bound and gilt.” Customers could choose whichever looked most appealing to them. If they did not care for the available bindings, they could purchase an unbound copy and have it bound to their specifications. Book catalogs and advertisements offered a variety of choices when it came to the physical aspects of reading materials, not just the contents.

Robert Fowle may have also published book catalogs in the 1760s, but his newspaper advertisements would have achieved far greater distribution. They alerted prospective customers to the “large Assortment” at his shop, introducing them to titles that they might not have previously considered but now wished to own (and perhaps even read) once they became aware of their availability.

Slavery Advertisements Published July 15, 1768

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 1
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 2
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 3
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 4
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 5
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 6
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 7
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 8
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 9
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 10
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 11
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 12
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 13
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).

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Jul 15 - South Carolina and American General Gazette Slavery 14
South-Carolina and American General Gazette (July 15, 1768).